mercoledì 30 settembre 2015

How Well Do You Remember The Intro To "Danny Phantom"?

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He's a phantom, Danny Phantom.

Now jam to this awesome theme song!

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17 Not-Too-Scary Halloween Movies For People Who Are Easily Scared

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Sometimes you just want to watch a Halloween movie and NOT have a heart attack.

If this is you watching scary movies...

If this is you watching scary movies...

...then you could probably use some movie suggestions for Halloween that AREN'T super scary. We got your back.

Dreamworks

Hocus Pocus (1993)

Hocus Pocus (1993)

Hocus Pocus is most definitely a movie for kids, but the nostalgia factor for those who grew up watching it makes it a Halloween necessity. For other adults, the delight of watching Bette Midler, Kathy Najimi and Sarah Jessica Parker play the Sanderson sisters makes for good October entertainment.

Scariness Factor: ?

Disney

The Addams Family (1991)

The Addams Family (1991)

The perfectly cast movie adaptation of the classic TV show makes for great family-friendly viewing around Halloween, especially since there are enough jokes in here to keep the grown-ups entertained. You could watch Addams Family Values too, but that's best saved for Thanksgiving.

Scariness Factor: ?

Paramount Pictures

Beetlejuice (1988)

Beetlejuice (1988)

Scary only in the most cartoonish, Tim-Burton-ish sort of ways, Beetlejuice sets the perfect tone for Halloween without specifically being a Halloween movie. Also, Michael Keaton is a national treasure.

Scariness Factor: ?

Warner Bros.


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21 Frighteningy Fun Things To Do At Disneyland This Halloween

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Disneyland is a blast in October — especially on Mickey's Halloween Party nights.

Check out the outrageous and awesome costumes other park guests wear.

Spotting incredible people like the Alice in Wonderland family above is part of the fun of Mickey's Halloween Party Nights (which require a separate ticket to attend, it should be mentioned).

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Ride Space Mountain — Halloween style.

Ride Space Mountain — Halloween style.

"Space Mountain Ghost Galaxy" is described as taking brave souls "through a haunted section of space," but what that really means is that the freaky-looking face in the photo above will intermittently appear as a projection in front of you, screaming and reaching out for you. Warning: You might toss your Dole whip.

Paul Hiffmeyer

Visit as many trick-or-treat stations as you can without being overwhelmed by self loathing.

There are many spots throughout the park where cast members man glorious, candy-filled carts. They also hand-out some healthy options, too, like carrots, apples, and crackers.

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Check out the Dia de los Muertos display.

Check out the Dia de los Muertos display.

This cool — and colorful — display features cheerful skeletons (including the fella above rocking a stand-up bass), sugar skulls and marigolds.

Paul Hiffmeyer


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Which Dark One From "Once Upon A Time" Are You Really?

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"Because I'm the Dark One."

If D.W. From "Arthur" Had Snapchat

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The sassiest 5-year-old on the planet just got even sassier.

PBS

PBS

PBS

PBS


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Can You Identify These Cars From "Grand Theft Auto: Vice City"?

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"Welcome to Vice City. Welcome to the 1980s."

Rockstar Games

How Well Do You Remember The Kids From "Hey Arnold!"?

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"Move it, football head!"

The Trailer For The New Season Of "The X-Files" Is Out, And It Is Intensely Awesome

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The truth is still out there.

This trailer, uploaded by FOX, is our first glimpse into what the new season of The X-Files has to offer. And by the looks of it, we won't be disappointed.

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The tenth season trailer opens up with a mysterious man (Joel McHale) showing up at Mulder's front door asking for his expertise.

The tenth season trailer opens up with a mysterious man (Joel McHale) showing up at Mulder's front door asking for his expertise.

FOX

After some solo sleuthing doesn't pay off...

After some solo sleuthing doesn't pay off...

FOX

... He calls up an old friend for some help.

... He calls up an old friend for some help.

FOX


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Can You Name These "Game Of Thrones" Castles?

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How well do you know the strongholds of Westeros?

Some Lucky People Are Having Christmas Dinner In The Great Hall At Hogwarts

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Update: The dinner event is now sold out :((( However, it's not all bad news!

Warner Brothers

Warner Bros


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Who Was The Ultimate "Buffy The Vampire Slayer" Couple?

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For a Hellmouth, there sure was a lot of lovin'.

Let's be honest, Buffy the Vampire Slayer is one of the most iconic shows of all time.

Let's be honest, Buffy the Vampire Slayer is one of the most iconic shows of all time.

The WB

And it created some pretty damn memorable romances too.

And it created some pretty damn memorable romances too.

Bangel ❤️.

The WB

Remember the intense relationship between Spike and Drusilla?

Remember the intense relationship between Spike and Drusilla?

The WB

Or the beautiful bond between Tara and Willow?

Or the beautiful bond between Tara and Willow?

???

The WB


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23 Times The Sims Accurately Summed Up Being A Twentysomething

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Things would be easier if rosebud or motherlode worked IRL.

When you graduate and you kinda have NO FREAKIN' IDEA what to do next.

When you graduate and you kinda have NO FREAKIN' IDEA what to do next.

EA Games

When your housemates start coupling up and you're like "lol, is there still room on the couch for me?"

When your housemates start coupling up and you're like "lol, is there still room on the couch for me?"

EA Games

When you come home to a messy AF house and curse your housemates, because you're not their damn mother.

When you come home to a messy AF house and curse your housemates, because you're not their damn mother.

EA Games

When you're home alone and use it as an excuse to prance around and admire yourself.

When you're home alone and use it as an excuse to prance around and admire yourself.

EA Games


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Lea Michele Is Finding Life After "Glee"

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Kevin Winter / Getty Images

For six years, Lea Michele and Rachel Berry — the unwaveringly determined Broadway baby she played on Fox's musical-comedy Glee — were one and the same in the eyes of the show's fans.

When they bought Rachel's songs on iTunes, it was Michele's voice they sang along to. When they watched Rachel learn to accept her flaws, it was Michele's confidence they were witnessing. When Rachel mourned her boyfriend Finn Hudson by belting "Make You Feel My Love" through tear-filled eyes, it was Michele's real-life loss of Cory Monteith they felt. They grew with Rachel, they learned alongside her, and they celebrated her successes.

"A lot of it was really cool," Michele told BuzzFeed News of the writers' penchant for pulling from her life for the character. "They wrote me the richest storylines … so I always felt, as an actor, incredibly satisfied." But she was quick to add, with a laugh, "Although, if it were me, I would have never left Funny Girl."

And if Michele had it her way, she may never have left Glee either. "There were very few of us who lasted the test of time on Glee. A lot of people dipped in and out towards the end, but there wasn't one episode I was not in," she said. "And that's because I really wanted to be 100% at that job."

Darren Criss, Lea Michele, and Chris Colfer in the Glee series finale

Fox

But in March 2015, Michele had to say goodbye to the character she'd become synonymous with, to the set she'd called home, and to the people she worked with since Glee began in 2009. "I'm very ritualistic, so for the month before leaving the show I did everything I wanted to do — I had my personal goodbye moments with each part of the set and with each person in the show," Michele said. "What we did at the end of the show was, when they said, 'That's a wrap on Glee,' myself, Jon Groff, Kevin McHale, Chord [Overstreet], Amber [Riley], Becca [Tobin], Darren [Criss], and Chris Colfer sat on the stage — all by ourselves — in a circle and just reminisced. We all said what we loved about the experience. We really made sure that all of our goodbyes were thorough so I could leave that feeling good about the ending. I really mourned that loss in a very proper way so that once the show was done, I could leave and feel OK."

The series finale showed Rachel Berry with a baby on the way and a Tony to her name. It was proof the character had a bright future in her dream industry, and now Michele is hoping the same will be true for herself.

"The reality is that Glee definitely created a great platform of fans for us, but the future is about sustaining that," she said, repositioning herself in a giant leather club chair nestled in the corner of a back office at The Grove's Barnes & Noble. "The future is about still doing a good job and not being one of those people who was on a successful TV show and then can't handle it anymore. I want to be at this place right now and sustain this little bubble in this business that I've created. I made this little nook here and I like it."

But after playing Rachel Berry for more than 100 episodes, it wasn't just Glee fans who had conflated Michele with her character — it was Hollywood as well. "I think there's definitely an issue with leaving such an iconic show, playing such an iconic character for so many seasons," she said of the typecasting she confronted as she set out to find her first post-Rachel role. "I think that's definitely an issue people face in this industry in trying to step into another job. So I was very conscious to make sure my next project was very different from Rachel Berry."

Michele on Scream Queens.

Fox

Luckily she didn't have to look too far or wait too long for that project to materialize. In January 2015, a month before production wrapped on Glee, Michele signed on to star on Fox's horror-comedy Scream Queens from Glee co-creator Ryan Murphy. "I was definitely planning on taking a little bit of a break and giving people a chance to breathe between Glee, but when this opportunity came along, 'no' wasn't even an option," Michele said of playing Hester Ulrich, an awkward, unpopular college student who sports an unmistakable neck brace and fends off the murderous Red Devil.

"Ryan is such a genius," Michele continued of the man who became her boss once more. "He was really able to do exactly what I needed, which was to show people a completely different side of who I am and 100% erase — not that I want to erase Rachel Berry — but have people see me as someone else right out of the gate."

Michele also has another project to keep her busy and showcase another side of herself, You First: Journal Your Way to Your Best Life. "Journaling for me was always goal-oriented," she said. "I found that I was able to achieve more of my dreams by writing things down and manifesting them and making them happen." Her second book covers fitness, diet, work, school, and relationships, all things Michele posts about on social media to her 10 million and counting followers. But whether she's passing along fitness tips or demystifying the red carpet process, Michele said the underlying message of every single post is the same: Just be your best self, a mantra the 29-year-old works hard to be true to every single day.

Jason Merritt / Getty Images

"I always make sure that who I am in this business is a role model that everyone from my fans to my baby cousin to my mother can look and say, 'She's doing the right thing,'" Michele said, leaning forward for emphasis. "I feel that in this business you're afforded with so many great opportunities and at that point, it's your choice what you do with those opportunities. I've chosen to always take this platform that I've been given and use it in as much of an aspiring and positive way. That's all I try to do. I've met a lot of people in this industry where you have an impression of who they are, and then behind the scenes it's completely different. I've always been the kind of person where what you see is what you get. This is who I am. What you see on social media is not a front, it's not fake; I really do live this way."

And with You First now in stores and filming on the first season of Scream Queens nearing completion, Michele has begun to turn her attention to her next big project: her second album.

In 2014, Michele released Louder amid a swirl of high-profile publicity and omnipresent radio play for her lead single "Cannonball." While the album debuted at No. 4 on the Billboard 200 chart, her follow-up singles struggled to break through. But that's because she had broken her No. 1 rule.

Michele with Barbra Streisand in February 2015.

Alberto E. Rodriguez / Getty Images

"I don't feel like you hear Lea on that record," Michele said of Louder, which was recorded in shoehorned bursts whenever she had time off from filming Glee. "I think I was blinded a lot by the excitement of making a record, the excitement of people sending me songs, and frankly, I felt the pressure to be like Katy, to be like Kelly, to be on the radio. And I don't care about that anymore."

This time, Michele will produce the record she envisioned making long before Glee. "I am making a record that is 100% Lea Michele — it's theatrical, but still current; it's everything from the vibe of '90s Celine Dion to Barbra Streisand. It's not about who I sound like anymore," she said. "And if people love it, great — but all that matters to me is that it's me."

It's clear Michele is leaning on the lessons she learned over the last seven years of working late nights and long weekends, but more than anything else, she wants her career to be guided by the single principle she momentarily lost sight of.

"I am the biggest advocate for uniqueness and accepting your uniqueness, and it was such a lesson for me to realize that I didn't accept my uniqueness with my first record," Michele said. "I've had great success in this industry by just doing things that were unique to me and that's exactly what I'm going to do now. I tried to mold myself to be like other people — and now, fuck that! I am just doing me, 100%!"

You First is now in stores and Scream Queens airs Tuesdays on Fox.

How Many James Bond Films Have You Seen?

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Shaken, not stirred.

martedì 29 settembre 2015

19 Reasons The Nintendo 64 Is The Greatest Console Of All Time

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N64 is love. N64 is life.

Because nothing will top the wonder of running through a 3D Mario level for the first time ever.

Because nothing will top the wonder of running through a 3D Mario level for the first time ever.

Nintendo

And even the start screen was magical.

And even the start screen was magical.

Nintendo

Because you may have shed a tear or two at the end of Star Fox 64.

Because seeing this should absolutely stress you out.


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Can You Guess Which Sherlock Holmes Said It?

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How familiar are you with the many portrayals of literature's greatest detective.

27 Things Even Die-Hard Mario Fans Don’t Know About Mario

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Over 30 years together and we still have so much to learn about our little Italian friend.

While developing Luigi, for the original Mario Bros., memory limitations meant the character had to be a duplicate of Mario, so Shigeru Miyamoto differentiated the second character by applying the color palette from the shellcreeper to the sprite.

While developing Luigi, for the original Mario Bros., memory limitations meant the character had to be a duplicate of Mario, so Shigeru Miyamoto differentiated the second character by applying the color palette from the shellcreeper to the sprite.

Nintendo

There are a possible 256 hidden, glitchy levels on the original Super Mario Bros. cartridge that can be accessed by swapping it out with a Tennis cartridge while the game is running.

There are a possible 256 hidden, glitchy levels on the original Super Mario Bros. cartridge that can be accessed by swapping it out with a Tennis cartridge while the game is running.

youtube.com

According to urban legend, Mario as he's depicted on the original cover of Super Mario Bros. is moments from running into a wall, falling into lava, and dying. But, according to Shigeru Miyamoto this is not the case.

According to urban legend, Mario as he's depicted on the original cover of Super Mario Bros. is moments from running into a wall, falling into lava, and dying. But, according to Shigeru Miyamoto this is not the case.

Nintendo

The clouds and bushes in Super Mario Bros. are the same graphic, just with alternate color palettes.

The clouds and bushes in Super Mario Bros. are the same graphic, just with alternate color palettes.

Nintendo


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Fans Try Expired Star Wars Snacks

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"Dust… Everywhere."

BuzzFeed Video / Via youtu.be

Can You Guess The Video Game From Its Highly Literal Summary?

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Your strategy guides can't save you now.

A bunch of friends force each other into car accidents with fruit and reptile roadkill.

A bunch of friends force each other into car accidents with fruit and reptile roadkill.

Ahmed Ali Akbar / BuzzFeed

A boy vandal comes of age.

A boy vandal comes of age.

Ahmed Ali Akbar / BuzzFeed

A single mother struggles to raise her son in a world without morals or schools.

A single mother struggles to raise her son in a world without morals or schools.

Ahmed Ali Akbar / BuzzFeed


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The Author Of "A Series Of Unfortunate Events" Just Donated $1 Million To Planned Parenthood

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"We've been very fortunate, and good fortune should be shared with noble causes," tweeted Daniel Handler.

Twitter / Via Twitter: @DanielHandler


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Are These Characters From "Fallout 3" Or "Fallout: New Vegas"?

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Whether it's Washington, D.C., or the Mojave Desert, war never changes.

Emma Watson Has Flawlessly Called Out Sexism In The Film Industry

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"I have been directed 17 times by men and only twice by women."

It's no secret that actress and all-round wonderful woman Emma Watson is a firm believer in the power of feminism.

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In September last year, she made an incredibly powerful speech as UN Women Goodwill Ambassador, calling for more men to stand up for gender equality...

And since then has been incredibly outspoken regarding her views on feminism and the patriarchy.

I have experienced sexism in that I have been directed by male directors 17 times and only twice by women. Of the producers I've worked with, 13 have been male, and only one has been a woman ... The men at the top often find it difficult to relate to a lot of the problems women face and therefore we aren't taken very seriously.


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See Emma Stone As Spider-Gwen In The Movie That'll Never Happen

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Excuse me while I mourn the non-existence of this movie.

Sony

Sony

Anthony Harvey / Stringer / Getty Images


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Which TV Character Should You Be For Halloween This Year?

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Khaleesi or Heisenberg? Find out now.

Can You Name These 50 Pixar Characters?

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There's 50 questions, and it's pretty tough, so good luck. To infinity, and beyond.

This Is What Your Favourite PS1 Games Look Like Now

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Happy 20th birthday, PlayStation!

DMA Design

Rockstar North


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How An Anxious Space Geek Became Hollywood’s Most Unlikely Star

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Charlotte Gomez for BuzzFeed

Speaking at a spacious movie theater in Southern California back in early August, Andy Weir found himself sharing the stage with Ridley Scott, Matt Damon, NASA bigwigs, and even an honest-to-god astronaut.

Weir was promoting the upcoming film The Martian, based on his novel of the same name, to an audience of science journalists. After a glowing introduction, he grabbed the microphone with a wry smile. "So yeah... This is a Cinderella moment for me."

In 1999, when he was 27 years old, Weir was laid off from his job as a software engineer at AOL and took a three-year writing sabbatical to see if he could make it as a writer. He finished a manuscript, but couldn't find an agent to represent it. He figured his dreams of becoming a novelist were as far-fetched as an astronaut stranded on Mars returning to Earth alive. Now 16 years later, Weir has managed to write one of the most talked-about science fiction stories in a generation. Not only that, but he's risen to fame with grace and humility, all while managing a fear of flying and other manifestations of an anxiety disorder.

NASA astronaut Drew Feustel, left, actor Matt Damon, director Ridley Scott, author Andy Weir, and Director of the Planetary Science Division at NASA Headquarters Jim Green, at a press event for The Martian.

Bill Ingalls / Getty Images

After his disappointing sabbatical, Weir went back to software engineering. But over the next several years, just for fun, he started putting serialized sci-fi stories on his blog, which had built up a small but loyal following. One of those stories was The Martian. "I posted a chapter once in awhile, whenever the hell I felt like it," Weir told the movie-theater crowd. He had accumulated about 3,000 readers on an old-fashioned email list. But that was about it in terms of exposure.

So when, in 2012, he posted the final chapter of The Martian to his personal website, he figured that it was simply time to move on to a new project. But then he started getting emails from fans.

"They said things like, 'Hey, I really loved your story … but I hate your website because it's crap,'" Weir said, admitting to the audience that the site truly was crap. His fans wanted a simple e-reader version of the book, so he made one. The book slowly climbed the Amazon best-seller lists.

Unbeknownst to Weir, an agent named Julian Pavia at Crown Publishing, a division of Random House, took notice, and passed it along to his colleague, David Fugate. Weir, whose inability to land an agent had once crippled his writing dreams, eagerly signed with Fugate.

Charlotte Gomez for BuzzFeed

Remarkably, Random House was not the only media corporation interested in Weir's story. "While David and Julian were negotiating the deal for the book rights, Fox came for the movie rights," Weir told the crowd. The two deals, each north of six figures, were made four days apart.

The print version of the book was published in February 2014 and ultimately jumped to the top of the New York Times best-seller list. Later, Fox greenlit the movie project after Ridley Scott agreed to direct the film adaptation starring Matt Damon and Jessica Chastain.

This was a crazy deal. Simon Kinberg, the producer who developed The Martian for 20th Century Fox as well as several X-Men films, told BuzzFeed that it is extremely rare for a studio to make a film from a book that, when optioned, hadn't even been published yet.

"Big movies tend to be based on sort of a well-known underlying material, whether it's comic books, or a remake of another movie," Kinberg said. "It's rare that something comes from a truly original place, and that's what Andy's book gave us."

Weir, who said he gets anxious even driving to meet his friends for a meal, was thrust under a jarringly hot spotlight.


The Martian's protagonist is astronaut Mark Watney, who after an aborted NASA mission to Mars is left wounded and alone on the surface of the cold, dusty, red planet. After regaining consciousness, Watney finds himself with two months of supplies and no way to contact anyone on Earth or his fellow crewmates on their long flight back home.

What follows are a series of problems — problems for Watney, but also the same kind of scientific problems that NASA engineers are paid to solve. Watney, among many other challenges, has to figure out how to maintain oxygen levels, produce water, grow food, contact mission control, and modify rovers for travel — all while maintaining his sanity when the only source of entertainment is a crewmate's fully stocked library of disco tunes and a collection of '70s television shows.

Each of these problems is meticulously described. Weir, through Watney, shows his work as if he were in a series of graduate seminars dedicated to orbital mechanics, mission planning, chemistry, and biology.

Speaking to BuzzFeed by Skype (with sporadic interruptions by his two cats), Weir said that when he started, he didn't know anyone at NASA or the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the NASA facility behind the unmanned missions to Mars that's featured prominently in his book. Given the remarkable scientific accuracy and spot-on description of the political environment at NASA, this fact is almost as remarkable as Weir's precipitous rise to fame.

In fact, at a Comic-Con panel back in July, NASA's head of planetary research, Dr. Jim Green, described The Martian as "required reading" at NASA. Perhaps because nearly all of the technology in the book is already feasible, the story plays a prominent role in NASA's efforts to build public support for its plans to get a human on Mars — an effort that, for now, is not much more than some beautiful posters and cool ideas that lack congressional funding.

A NASA poster highlighting their plan to send a human to Mars.

NASA / Via nasa.gov

Green, a veteran of NASA's Mars program and also the scientific adviser for the film, told BuzzFeed that The Martian's scientific details provides "a very heightened opportunity for us to talk about Mars and talk about how we're going to get there."

Many space policy types have suggested that The Martian and its movie adaptation could reinvigorate the space program. But Weir, with his characteristic humility, isn't comfortable taking credit for that.

"Everyone's just assuming and kind of saying that The Martian is increasing public awareness and interest in space," he said. "I think they're not considering the other possibility, that maybe The Martian is popular because public awareness and interest in space is increasing on its own."


Without professional contacts in the space industry, Weir did all of his initial research for The Martian using Google — that, plus his massive bank of knowledge garnered from years of watching pretty much every documentary ever made about human spaceflight. If he needed to write something about physics, he'd run questions by his dad, who had worked as a physicist for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California.

With a physicist dad and an engineer mom, Weir's childhood was steeped in science. His dad was also a science fiction buff, and Weir grew up reading his seemingly inexhaustible supply of '50s and '60s sci-fi novels.

Weir always wanted to be a writer, but was skeptical of turning these passions into a career. "I wanted to eat regular meals and not sleep on a park bench," he told BuzzFeed. So he turned his professional interests toward software engineering. And he was good at it — he was first hired, at age 15, as a programmer at Sandia National Laboratory.

Eventually his career led him to AOL at the height of the first Silicon Valley tech boom — and the subsequent bust. In 1999, Weir was laid off and forced to cash in his very lucrative stock options at a time when, unbeknownst to anyone, they were at their peak value. "I had a bunch of money," Weir said. "I realized I could go about three years without having to work."

This three-year sabbatical was his first, and largely unsuccessful, attempt at becoming a professional writer. Without any interest from major publishers, he went back to work as a software engineer in 2002.

Charlotte Gomez for BuzzFeed

"I kind of decided, well, what I'm going to do is just write for fun and post stories to my website," he said, one chapter at a time. This piecemeal approach to writing allowed Weir to stick to the stunning levels of scientific accuracy that characterize The Martian.

By releasing his books to a devoted and informed fan base, he pretty much had every chapter peer-reviewed by engineers, scientists, and other hardcore science enthusiasts. He'd receive friendly emails pointing out that he may have gotten a couple of minor details wrong, and he would change the book accordingly.

Unlike during the sabbatical, when he was focused on getting the attention of an agent, this time he was able to relax and follow his bliss. "I wasn't trying to please anybody but myself," he said.


In press appearances Weir has often admitted that his protagonist, Watney, is an extension of all his good parts, without any of the bad parts — a sort of aspirational version of himself. Intellect and wit, for example, are shared by both character and creator. "I'm a smart-ass," he told BuzzFeed, with a sly grin.

But there are striking differences, too. Weir told BuzzFeed that he has struggled with generalized anxiety disorder for most of his life. "[Watney's] me without the anxiety disorder in a large part," he said, "He's calm. No matter how bad things get, he doesn't freak out. He can handle what life throws at him, and I can't always."

For example, Weir is deeply afraid of flying — until April of this year, he hadn't boarded a plane since 2007. He's also struggled with more amorphous anxieties, such as ruminating on seemingly inconsequential things. "Things bother me a lot more than they should. When something minor goes wrong, it's very upsetting to me," he said.

He also has problems with uncertainty and transition, he said, sometimes disrupting his sleep. "I feel really, really insecure when things are in a transitional state," he told BuzzFeed. "I don't mind being at home, I don't mind being at a restaurant with my friends, but getting from home to the restaurant with my friends I'm worried about everything. It's like, Am I going to hit traffic? Am I going to take a wrong turn? Is there going to be enough parking there? Did I get the time or date wrong? Am I going to end up looking stupid here?"

Anxiety medication, something he turned to only recently, has helped him manage these kinds of daily stresses, he added. "I feel like it's really improved my life. It's not like this big sudden change or anything. It's just stuff that used to bother me a lot doesn't bother me as much."

Given the way that transitional periods and uncertainty bother Weir, his ascension from hobby writer to best-selling author was, understandably, fraught with a great deal more emotional peril than the strikingly calm, cool, and collected version of himself he presented at the movie theater that August morning.

Weir told BuzzFeed that it was one of the most stressful periods he's ever experienced. "It was really rough," he said. Every step of the way was a struggle. There was never any "champagne moment" — just a series of updates that made things seem incrementally, and painfully, more likely. "Talk about anxiety," he said. "Good Lord."

Charlotte Gomez for BuzzFeed

He said the movie deal didn't really feel final until the first day of production on the film, because that was the day he got his first check from Fox since the movie was optioned.

Watney's character requires constant vigilance and Weir's storytelling relies on a constant supply of problems that need to be solved, so it would make sense that Weir's anxiety had helped him compose The Martian. But Weir isn't so sure. "I don't think it's [helped] in a positive way," he told BuzzFeed, other than perhaps making him "paranoid enough" to think through all of the ramifications of a plot. But ultimately, he said, "it's just been unpleasant."

Like Watney, Weir has been thrust into a fairly unimaginable situation, and these new circumstances have forced Weir to set out on uncomfortable journeys, too. He has to fly a lot more now, and notes that he has made great progress on that front. Before a flight, he now takes anti-anxiety medication given to him specifically for his fear of flying.

"What I do," he said, "is I take it half an hour before boarding so it'll be in full effect when I'm getting on the plane, so I'm not, 'Oh, God. I'm walking down the tunnel to my death.'"

The juxtaposition between the unflinching Mark Watney and the anxiety-prone Andy Weir can seem jarring. Watney is a fearless astronaut at ease with planning a long and potentially deadly journey over unexplored and uncertain terrain. Weir specifically has problems with uncertainty, with transition, and perhaps most relevant, with travel.

But there's actually much more of Watney in Weir than the author admits. The character's authenticity is obvious from the very beginning of the novel, and that's likely a huge part of why Weir has found such success.

"The tone and the voice, to me, is what felt so unique and exciting," Kinberg told BuzzFeed. "I felt if we could capture that sort of, I call it intelligent optimism, and real humor and humanity, then it could be a really entertaining film, and different from other science fiction."

Weir comes off as deeply intelligent but also remarkably playful, self-aware, and self-effacing. He knows exactly who he is and what he stands for — just as he knows what he wanted The Martian to be — a work of fiction created primarily to satisfy his own interests. These are the same traits that make Watney such a fun character to root for.

Andy Weir at the premiere of The Martian at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Kevin Winter / Getty Images

Both Weir and Watney are irreverent, and love speaking truth to power. When NASA personnel were asked at that press event to give their thoughts on the proposed "one-way mission to Mars," a project known as Mars One, the officials hemmed and hawed. Not Weir. He called the idea "a joke."

In the face of his rapid success, Weir remains remarkably humble. "It's amazing what you can get used to," he said. "It's like this has been creeping up for awhile. It never really felt real to me until a couple weeks ago when I saw a cut of the film." He said that he choked up watching the movie for the first time.

Some things have changed for Weir, though, and he seems just as proud of these more humble achievements as he does his remarkable success. In a 2014 interview with Entertainment Weekly, Weir said that he didn't date. "I'm terrible with women," he said. Now, things are different. He's dating a woman he met at a press event related to The Martian, and he seems palpably excited about the relationship.

"In typical kind of form for me, she asked me out," he said. "I'm definitely too chickenshit to ask women out."