lunedì 4 gennaio 2016

That Chemist From “Making A Murderer” Will Awaken You Scientifically

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She isn't the hero we deserve, but she is the one we need.

This is Janine Arvizu, a hero analytical chemist and a laboratory data quality auditor whose testimony appeared in Netflix's true-crime documentary Making a Murderer.

This is Janine Arvizu, a hero analytical chemist and a laboratory data quality auditor whose testimony appeared in Netflix's true-crime documentary Making a Murderer.

Netflix

She reviewed the argument that Steven Avery, the documentary's protagonist, couldn't have had his blood planted on a crime scene because a new test said so.

She reviewed the argument that Steven Avery, the documentary's protagonist, couldn't have had his blood planted on a crime scene because a new test said so.

The test was based on finding a chemical called EDTA. It is found in the evidence vials that store blood. If it was found in Avery's blood samples taken from victim Teresea Halbach's car, then it would have suggested someone took his blood (which was in the possession of the police) and planted it on the scene of the crime. The test, which was conducted by the FBI at the request of the state with little documentation, didn't detect it.

Netflix

The science presented by the FBI's expert could reasonably be described as not fit for peer review. Here's Avery's lawyer and the expert in question:

The science presented by the FBI's expert could reasonably be described as not fit for peer review. Here's Avery's lawyer and the expert in question:

Netflix

Netflix


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