giovedì 10 marzo 2016

13 More Facts We Just Learned About American Wizards

http://ift.tt/1XcN2e1

Puritans and Salem Witch Trials and a magical Congress, oh my!

Wednesday morning, J.K. Rowling released the second installment of her new writing (you can read about the first here) about magic in America on Pottermore. Here's what we learned:

Wednesday morning, J.K. Rowling released the second installment of her new writing (you can read about the first here) about magic in America on Pottermore. Here's what we learned:

Afp / AFP / Getty Images

In the 17th century and beyond, European witches and wizards emigrated to America along with their No-Maj counterparts.

In the 17th century and beyond, European witches and wizards emigrated to America along with their No-Maj counterparts.

Sometimes it was out of adventure, but mostly it was to escape persecution or the wizarding authorities. (Again, No-Maj is the American version of Muggle.)

Pottermore / Via Twitter: @EW

The new witches and wizards tried to blend in with the No-Majs or hide among the existing Native American magical community.

The new witches and wizards tried to blend in with the No-Majs or hide among the existing Native American magical community.

Pottermore / Twitter: @EW

America was a harsher environment for the newcomers compared to Europe because there were unfamiliar magical plants, no established wandmakers, and only one wizarding school — Ilvermorny — but in its roughest early stages.

America was a harsher environment for the newcomers compared to Europe because there were unfamiliar magical plants, no established wandmakers, and only one wizarding school — Ilvermorny — but in its roughest early stages.

Pottermore


View Entire List ›